CFP for the RSA 2018 in NOLA

Call for papers for the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting in New Orleans in 2018.

Please submit your abstracts for one or more of these SRBHP-sponsored panels at the RSA next year. Check specific deadlines in May 2017 for these submissions below.

  1. New Approaches to Poetry by Women of Early Modern Spain

A Panel Sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry

The 1980s and 1990s witnessed the publication of several anthologies of texts by early modern Hispanic women writing inside convent walls and beyond. These newly edited texts set the stage for three decades of groundbreaking scholarly work on early modern women writers in Spain and elsewhere. The body of work that has resulted from this enterprise has radically changed the way we think about early modern Spanish literature and culture. Much of the scholarship on the production of these women focuses on narrative and on theater, despite the fact that there exists a large corpus of women’s poetry from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, some of it practically unknown. In this panel, we seek to learn how recent theoretical approaches and innovations in critical practice offer an opportunity to reconsider the extraordinary work accomplished by early modern Spanish women poets.

Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Elizabeth Davis (davis.823@osu.edu) by Thursday 25 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language).

 

2. Ut pictura poesis: Poetry, Painting, and Patronage in the Spanish Baroque at the Quadricentenary of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

 A Panel Sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry

This panel will consider how notions about the shared aesthetic experience of poetry and painting are exercised during the Spanish Baroque, and the extent to which the realities of patronage mediate, modify or detract from the power of the poetic word to evoke a spectacular and inspirational visual image.

The Horatian formulation of the analogy between poetry and painting may serve as a point of entrance into larger considerations about the connections between poetry, painting and patronage in the work of poets and painters of the Spanish Baroque. The topos that poems are paintings that speak, and that paintings are poems without words, enjoyed great currency in Humanist circles during the Spanish Renaissance. It can be said, however, that even as it was a point of debate, this idea continued to influence the way that poets and painters conceived of their life’s work well into the seventeenth century. At the same time, both artists of the word and those of the brush, such as Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682) and his Seville school, depended on a patronage system in which patrons and clientele had a direct effect on the kind of poems and paintings artists could produce.

Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Elizabeth Davis (davis.823@osu.edu) by Thursday 25 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language).

 

3. Remapping Influence. New Studies of Lyric and the Iberian Empires

 A Two-Part Panel Sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry

Narratives of influence are usually unidirectional. This is especially the case for narratives of imperial centers and peripheries in which influence is often depicted as belated, exaggerated or marked by artistic anxiety. Curiously, however, the imperial peripheries of Spanish and Portuguese empires were also locales of innovative experiments that often anticipated or surpassed metropolitan lyric form. These panels seek papers that invert common narratives of influence by discussing the innovation of lyric in peripheral geographies, boomerang effects of imperial lyric on the metropolis, lyric form that traveled with authors to and from imperial frontiers, dislocated centers of experimentation, and ways in which the geography of empire itself forced new forms of lyric circulation. How do these innovations and renewals force a reconsideration of the terms of imperial lyric? What does lyric do in and to Iberian empires?

Please send a 200-word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Juan Vitulli (jvitulli@nd.edu) and Anna More (anna1more1@gmail.com) by Monday, 15 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language).

 

 

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